How Long Is the Commute for New York City High School Students From Their Homes to Their Schools?

  • Citywide, the average high school student’s commute to school—by subway, bus, or foot—in school year 2011-2012 was estimated to take 32 minutes. In comparison, the commutes for city residents to jobs in the five boroughs averaged 39 minutes in 2012.
  • More than 1 in 5 high school students had commutes of 45 minutes or longer.
  • There was significant variation across census tracts in the share of students with longer commutes, reflecting both access to transit and school choice preferences.
  • The city’s Department of Education allows “hardship transfers” for high school students with commutes of more than 75 minutes. Less than 3 percent of high school students had commutes that long in school year 2011-2012.
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    The Geography of Student Commutes Longer Than 45 Minutes to School, School Year 2011-2012

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    Prepared by Asa Wilks
    New York City Independent Budget Office

    SOURCES: IBO analysis of Department of Education Data, American Community Survey
    NOTES: Calculations based on GoogleMaps estimate of trip times as of January and February 2014 between each student’s home and school address. Calculations reflect commuting time during business hours for students attending New York City high schools during the 2011-2012 school year. Trip duration includes walking time.

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    New York City By The Numbers

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    How Many Students Attend Nonpublic K-12 Schools in New York City?

    How Much Has Snow Removal Cost the City in Recent Years?

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    • The amount the city budgets each year for snow removal is set by a formula in the City Charter. The formula is the average of spending on snow removal in the five prior years—so the budget for 2014 is based on the actual amounts spent in fiscal years 2008–2012.
    • In some years the formula provides more funding than is needed while in other years, such as 2011 when the city had an extraordinary amount of snow, the formula-driven budget fell $87 million short of need. The formula budgeted $13 million more in 2012 than the city needed for snow removal and $19 million more in 2013.
    • If there is unused funding in the snow budget, that money is reallocated or becomes part of the city’s end of year budget surplus. Conversely, if the budgeted amount is short of what is needed, funds are drawn from other parts of the city budget to cover the expense.

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    New York City By The Numbers

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    How Close Is NYC to Meeting the Affordable Housing Goals Set by the Bloomberg Administration?

    New York City Public Schools: Have Per Pupil Budgets Changed Since 2010-2011?

    Did the Number of Municipal Employees Decrease Under the Bloomberg Administration?

    When Mayor Bloomberg presented his last budget plan in November, he noted that the city’s full-time and full-time equivalent headcount had fallen by 15,368 since December 31, 2001. But looking at staffing levels since the end of fiscal year 2002, which marks the beginning of Mayor Bloomberg’s first full-year budget, the numbers are somewhat different.
    From June 30, 2002 through June 30, 2013, city staffing decreased by 9,028 positions and totaled 295,894 by the end of fiscal year 2013, a 3.0 percent decline.

    • For many agencies, there was little change in staffing from June 30, 2002.
    • Two areas of the budget accounted for the largest decrease in staffing, the education department and uniformed services.
    • The largest decrease—4,607 positions—occurred in uniformed services, including 1,986 police officers (a decline of 5.4 percent), 1,141 fire fighters (10.1 percent) and 1,645 correction officers (15.5 percent).
    • The education department saw a decrease of 4,496 positions (3.3 percent), of which 2,528 were teachers and professional staff.

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    New York City By The Numbers

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    New York City Public Payphones: How Many Are Left?

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    In January 2013 there were 11,249 working payphones in public locations citywide, a decline of almost
    50 percent since 2008.

    • The Bronx, Brooklyn, and Staten Island have seen decreases of about 60 percent.
    • The number of payphones has fallen 33 percent in Manhattan and 52 percent in Queens.

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    The city collects 10 percent of revenue from calls placed from payphones and 36 percent of revenue from advertisements on the payphones.

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    • City revenue from calls has declined steadily since 2008.
    • City revenue from advertising has increased sharply since 2010.

    SOURCE: Department of Information Technology and Telelcommunications

    Prepared by Nashla Salas
    New York City Independent Budget Office

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    New York City By The Numbers

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    Where Do NYC’s Teachers and Principals Live Compared With Where They Work?

    Teachers

    • 67% of the 70,328 teachers live within the five boroughs
    • Teachers in Queens and the Bronx are the most likely to live outside the five boroughs
    • 81% of Staten Island teachers live in the same borough as they work, as do 57% of Brooklyn teachers

    chart1nycbtn19Principals

    • 66% of the 1,570 principals live within the five boroughs
    • Principals in the Bronx and Queens are the most likely to live outside the five boroughs
    • 69% of Staten Island principals live in the same borough as they work, as do 45% of Brooklyn principals

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    Print version available here.

    New York City By The Numbers

    IBO Homepage

    New York City Independent Budget Office