NYC’s Jail Population: Who’s There and Why?

On an average day in fiscal year 2012,

  • 12,287 inmates in city jails
  • 57 percent are black, 33 percent Hispanic, 7 percent white, 1 percent Asian, and the rest other or unknown
  • 93 percent are male

The average annual cost per inmate in 2012 was $167,731

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10 Responses to “NYC’s Jail Population: Who’s There and Why?”

  1. […] day NYC is housing over 2,000 drug offenders in jail, mostly for felony violations. According to a study from the Independent Budget Office, New York City spent an average of $167,731 per inmate last […]

  2. […] a year at Princeton would cost a student, the Atlantic reports. In NYC, that number is $168,000, according to the Independent Budget […]

  3. […] The Independent Budget Office found that in 2012 it cost the city $167,731 to hold each of its daily average of 12,287 inmates, or about $460 per inmate per day. […]

  4. […] Independent Budget Office found that in 2012 it cost the city $167,731 to hold each of its daily average of 12,287 inmates, or […]

  5. […] Independent Budget Office found that in 2012 it cost the city $167,731 to hold each of its daily average of 12,287 inmates, or […]

  6. […] The Independent Budget Office found that in 2012 it cost the city $167,731 to hold each of its daily average of 12,287 inmates, or about $460 per inmate per day. […]

  7. […] Blacks have always been more likely to perceive bias in the Justice System, with anecdotal and statistical evidence supporting their claims. NYC’s jail system seems to only further buttress the argument; while Blacks only make up 26% of New York City’s population, they comprise 57% of the city’s jail population, according to a recent study. […]

  8. […] On any one day, at least 9,300 people are awaiting trial in a New York City jail, according to figures from the City’s Independent Budget Office. […]

  9. sexualité says:

    sexualité

    NYC’s Jail Population: Who’s There and Why? « New York City by the Numbers