Category Archives: Social Services

Are New York City’s Part-Time, Low-Income Workers More Reliant On Medicaid than Similar Workers in Other Parts of the State?

More than half (51.3 percent) of the state’s lowest income part-time workers—those with incomes at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level—resided in New York City in 2012.

  • A greater reliance on Medicaid among New York City’s lowest income part-time workers may be linked to their lower rate of enrollment in employer-sponsored health insurance compared with the rest of the state.
  • A smaller share of low-income, part-time workers was uninsured in the city than in the downstate suburbs. But an even smaller share of these workers was uninsured upstate, where the rate of enrollment in employer-sponsored health insurance was highest in the state.

For more details on regional differences in health insurance coverage across New York State, see IBO’s recent report “Medicaid, Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance & the Uninsured in New York: Regional Differences in Health Insurance Coverage.”

New York City Independent Budget Office

SOURCE: American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample 2012
NOTES: Percentages do not sum to 100. Direct purchase insurance and Medicare are excluded, and individuals may have both employer-sponsored health insurance and Medicaid. The federal poverty level for a family of four in 2012 was about $23,500.

Print version available here.

New York City By The Numbers

IBO Homepage

Has the Long-Term Increase in Food Stamp Usage Finally Come to an End?

 

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  • From June 2006 through June 2013, the number of New York City residents receiving food stamps (now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP) increased by 71.1 percent, from 1.1 million to 1.9 million. From June 2013 through June 2014, however, the number of recipients fell by 118,000, or 6.3 percent.
  • Recent decreases in the number of food stamp recipients likely reflect improvements in the local labor market.
    Nationwide, over the same June 2013-June 2014 period, the number of individuals receiving food stamps fell by a more modest 2.6 percent.
  • As a result of the decreased caseload as well as federal reductions in per family grant payments beginning in November 2013, total food stamp grants to city residents decreased by $244 million, or 6.9 percent, from fiscal year 2013 to 2014.

 

Prepared by Paul Lopatto
New York City Independent Budget Office

SOURCES: IBO analysis of data from the New York City Human Resources Administration, the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, and the United States Department of Agriculture

Print version available here.

New York City By The Numbers

IBO Homepage

 

What Program Is the Largest Source of Income Support Grants for Low-Income New York City Residents?

Over the last decade, the number of city residents receiving food stamps has more than doubled, while public assistance recipients have decreased and the number of blind and disabled New Yorkers receiving Supplemental Security Income benefits has remained flat.

In fiscal year 2012 city residents received $3.4 billion in food stamp benefits, compared with $2.9 billion from Supplemental Security Income and $1.4 billion from public assistance.

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PDF version here.

SOURCES: New York City Human Resources Administration; New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance
NOTE: Public assistance and Supplemental Security Income recipients may also receive food stamps.

Prepared by Paul Lopatto
New York City Independent Budget Office

New York City By The Numbers IBO Homepage